Features of the Inpatient Module for OpenEMR

The Inpatient Module manages beds, patients and stays. Load the OpenEMR system with Admin or Physician rights.

After clicking on the Patient/Client option, the new ítems appear in the bottom. In this image we show the options offered to the Administrator user:

initial inpatient menu

  • Inpatient options / A home page for the new options. It lists the reports that any user can run.
  • New bed/ It lets you create new beds, in different areas, floors or rooms. The beds can have attributes like male/female, TV or oxygen. Other features are possible with customization,
  • Assign patient bed/ Associates a patient already in the OpenEMR system to an empty bed. It records the entry date.
  • Assign patient bed – Clinical/ This is a regular LBF form, which records data outside the inpatient system, like reason for the inpatient stay, the entering doctor, diagnosis and other data.
  • Change patient bed/ It changes the bed, for same-day changes, without changing the stay number.
  • Release patient from bed/ It finishes the stay in bed
  • Edit beds/ Allows to change bed number, floor, room, área and attributes, like gender, TV or Oxygen. The only item that never changes is the Bed ID.
  • Inpatient list/ Lists all the current inpatients, with associated data, including cost.
  • Release list/ Lists all the already released patients, with associated data, including cost.
  • Free beds/ Lists the free beds.
  • Patient report/ Lists patients by name
  • Area-floor report/ / Lists patients by area and floor.

Continue reading “Features of the Inpatient Module for OpenEMR”

Our Inpatient Module for OpenEMR

Inpatient Module

The hospitalization system covers the main data registration needs in a hospital or clinic.

The first stage is to create the beds. A bed is always inside a room, in turn within a floor and within an area. The area can be General, Emergency, Surgery, Maternity, Intensive therapy, etc. The beds can be male/female, have TV or Oxygen. Other features can be added upon request. Continue reading “Our Inpatient Module for OpenEMR”

Inpatient module for OpenEMR – Ongoing project

The OpenEMR was originally for outpatients, but many claimed a new feature that allows the monitoring of hospitalizations. We are developing an Inpatient Module, including location, type of bed, floor, room, bed number, additional room , such as TV and oxygen, etc.

The reports include: Free beds – Inpatient days – Standard Inpatient  Number – Released patients – Accumulated cost for bed use

Continue reading “Inpatient module for OpenEMR – Ongoing project”

Health Insurance FAQ

How are the health insurance providers already admitted published?

First of all, each country has a different health system and denomination, but the most common is Health Insurance. In Argentina there are Obras Sociales (obligatory for all workers) or Prepaid Insurance o Prepagas (of voluntary affiliation). In Administration – Practice – Health insurance companies there is an editable list. Continue reading “Health Insurance FAQ”

Legal value of the Electronic Medical Record (Argentina)

This issue always arises in medical areas, especially hospitals. Sometimes, the possible unfavorable legal implications of computerization are an excuse for not computerizing, although increasingly weaker. Sometimes the subject highlights the inadequacy of the current legislation, still several decades behind reality.
For example, at a recent symposium in the Italian Hospital of Buenos Aires, a doctor from this advanced pioneer center in Medical Informatics, complained that as a result of a court case, a lawyer asked to seize the patient’s medical history, for which the judge wanted to take a complete server from the Data Center of the Hospital. This, regardless of the damage caused to the tens of thousands of patients whose stories resided on that same server.
Continue reading “Legal value of the Electronic Medical Record (Argentina)”

History of OpenEMR, unique, full featured EHR system

OpenEMR[1] is a medical data administration program which for Electronic Medical Records (EMR). It is ONC Entire Ambulatory EHR certified and it functions altogether with integrated electronic medical records, administration, scheduling and electronic billing.

The code  is written in PHP and works under a LAMP, albeit any operating classification with PHP is supported.

OpenEMR is clear and open code program business GNU (GPL). OpenEMR is subject to ongoing efforts of internationalization and localization in multiple languages around the globe. Support is offered by more than 30 vendors in  10 countries.

OpenEMR is one of the most accepted free of charge electronic medical records today with 7000 downloads per month.

Continue reading “History of OpenEMR, unique, full featured EHR system”

English description – PresuHisClinDig Budgeter for EMR

PresuHisClinDig is a software application that provides a cost estimation for an Electronic Medical Record System.

The budgeter is mainly oriented to OpenEMR – OpenEMR is an open source, free software for medical records. It fulfills all the security and quality requirements for HIPAA and other public agencies in the US. It supports the HL7 data exchange standard, exporting “Continuity of Care” documents with all the patient data, in a standard, compatible format.

PresuHisClinDig – screen shot:

The software is free to download, install and use. Professionals can charge for additional services, customization, hosting and related services.

PresuHisClinDig

This software calculates the cost of installation and maintenance of OpenEMR and other software, depending on the number of using doctors, patients and other variables. You can also check our online calculator.

Order PresuHisClinDig

No need to order. Just download from the link above, install and use.

Traceable Medicine

This bizz takes elements of several others described here.

 

Medicine has always been defined as part art, part science. Art resists definition and can not be traced, while science is the opposite. As a part-time practicing doctor, I know that Medical care is far from being exact science and the doctor-patient interaction is hardly traceable. We doctors enjoy certain impunity from the fact that not everything we do and advice is recorded, and our errors most of the times, get covered with dirt… Even those facts that get written can be left in paper or in electronic format that is not integrated in larger databases.

 

For instance, let’s compare several parts of patient-doctor interaction, in the old and modern ways of doing medicine:

 

 

Standard-traditional-Old Way

Connected-traceable-telework-New Way

Patient selects Doctor

Word of mouth

Advertising

Managed care org. decides

Whoever is available

Verifiable CV

Knowledge Marketplace

Doctor selects patient

Clinicians accept everyone

Specialists accept patients broadly within their specialty

 

Doctors search for patients in knowledge (medical service) marketplaces, which assure they stay within their proven abilities.

Initial interview

Spoken

Spoken + Audio record + full data entry in EMR. Telemedicine.

Medical Records

Paper or single PC

Electronic Medical Record  (EMR) in a Database

Data collection

Analogical forms (paper, X Ray film, thermo sensitive paper)

Digital forms integrated into the EMR

Medical decisions

Doctor’ call. Hunch. Coin toss. Infrequently, second medical opinion sought. Many times, from a friend or the first doctor who walks around.

Software assisted. Expert systems. Knowledge Marketplace. Telemedicine. Online qualification system for medical acts.

Outcome

Hopefully, everything Ok. Doctor performance is approximately estimated by those few that happen to know the case.

Permanently monitored by the Online Qualification System for Medical Acts.

 

 

Special examples of Traceable Medicine are clinical trials. When companies need to test new products or treatments define tests with extreme control of every variable, write strict protocols and appoint experts that ensure compliance. Everything is traceable. The results are solid enough to allow researchers to extract valid conclusions of general value.

 

Traceable Medicine will push health care away from art and into science. The result will be a less human patient-doctor relationship, but without doubt, success rates will be better and costs lower.

 

The “Online Qualification System for Medical Acts” does not exist and is a business by itself. It requires the EMR, for every participant being able to check patient data. Let’s show some properties:

 

  • can be complemented by Verifiable CVs, because the ratings that doctors obtain in this system can be added (if good…) to their CVs.

 

  • would be a useful Medical Marketing tool for the service providers in the Medical Knowledge Marketplace, because those with a good record can be trusted and sell themselves better.

 

  • will add credibility for those who participate in the Medical Social Networks.

 

  • will be able to run Contests (with many marketing opportunities). Of course, the patient will stay anonymous.

 

  • will be able to provide Certifications (a new business)

 

  • instead of passing tests, obtaining certifications and solving quizzes for free or paying a fee, Doctors will do it and at the same time, get paid for their work

 

  • large amounts of valuable data will be available for Public Health and Epidemiology technicians and experts, which will greatly improve Health Care in general.

 

 

Personal View

I envision huge resistance from doctors to accept traceable medicine. They still fiercely resist using PCs to keep appointments and data. And the pen and paper generation still rules over the young and connected.

We doctors enjoy certain impunity from the fact that not everything we do and advice is recorded, and our errors most of the times, get covered with dirt

A comparison of different EMR systems

From request from a client, I presented a paper at the Latin American Congress of Medical Informatics, INFOLAC, here in Buenos Aires. He produces an EMR product with some state-of-the-art features, and he wanted to introduce the subject into the med-info communitiy.

In parallel, I was looking for a product that I could use for remote consultation pacients. So, finally both lines converged and I had resources to do a quite complete research on the subject.

I was surprised to learn that, in spite of being in 2008 at full IT speed, most hospitals in Latin America and other places still keep medical records only in paper.

There is a nice opportunity to advance in this matter. I will soon publish the results of my survey on Web available EMR systems.